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2016 Conference presentations

Our Mandate

To make recommendations to Parliament, provincial legislatures, organised local government and other organs of state on financial and fiscal matters as envisaged in the Constitution and other national legislation.

Our Vision

To provide influential advice for an equitable, efficient and sustainable Intergovernmental Fiscal Relations (IGFR) system.

Our Mission

To provide proactive, expert and independent advice on promoting a sustainable and equitable IGFR system, through evidence based policy analysis to ensure the realization of our Constitutional values.

Recent Publications

2019/2020 Submission for the Division of Revenue

2019 2019 Annual Submission2019/20 Submission for the Division of Revenue

The 2019/20 Financial and Fiscal Commission’s submission is about the difficulties of sustaining equitable economic growth in the face of a constrained fiscal environment. Under the theme of Re-engineering the intergovernmental fiscal relations system for national development in a fiscally constrained environment, focus is on an extensive review of the performance and effectiveness of current intergovernmental fiscal instruments. The submission recommends how fiscal instruments can be re-engineered to better address the eradication of poverty and thereby the reduce inequality. This submission continues with the theme of the 2018/19 Division of Revenue submission with similar assessments of other areas of public finance issues. It reviews the effectiveness and performance of the current intergovernmental fiscal relations (IGFR) system, and makes recommendations to re-engineer current fiscal instruments, incentives and measures to address challenges that may be preventing the achievement of the NDP’s objectives. 

Click here to download the entire document (PDF:4Mb)

Potential Financing Options for Large Cities

Policy Brief 11 - Potential Financing Options for Large Cities

In South Africa large cities face a myriad of challenges including rapid urbanisation, poverty, inequality, unemployment and huge infrastructure needs. Although these are not unique to large cities, the magnitude of the challenges in large cities is greater and is increasingly becoming a major risk to the socioeconomic development of the country. The ability of cities to deal with these challenges depends, to a large extent, on their ability to generate more of their own revenues. As transfers and own revenues for large cities are heavily constrained, it is critical that cities leverage non-traditional and other innovative financing mechanisms. This policy brief summarises the findings of a study that evaluated different non-traditional revenues sources for South Africa’s large cities. Findings from the study suggest different options to enhance borrowing for large cities as well as strategies to improve public private partnership (PPP) deal flows in large cities. In addition, the study brings to the fore the value of land value capture mechanisms.

Click here to download this document (PDF:1Mb)

How the Cost of Information and Communication Technology Hampers Implementation of Financial Management Reforms in Lesser-Resourced Municipalities

Policy Brief 10 - How the Cost of Information and Communication Technology Hampers Implementation of Financial Management Reforms in Lesser-Resourced Municipalities

Currently South Africa has 278 municipalities with varying capabilities and capacity. The Municipal Finance Management Act requires municipalities to maintain efficient, effective and transparent systems and implement proper financial record keeping. One of the key reforms spearheaded in this regard is the Municipal Standard Chart of Accounts (mSCOA). Implementation of mSCOA is information and communication technology intensive and thus expensive. A consequence of this is that many municipalities will not be able to achieve compliance by the compulsory implementation date of July 2017. Given the potential benefits associated with ensuring a national standard around financial reporting at the local government level, it is recommended that ring-fenced funding in respect of mSCOA implementation be made available for lesser-resourced municipalities and that technical assistance be provided to the most under-resourced municipalities to assist with change management.

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2018/19 Technical Report

2018/19 Technical Report

The main purpose of this Technical Report is to explore how improving the efficiency of intergovernmental fiscal relations (IGFR) can assist national government, provinces and municipalities to stimulate urban development through prioritising public investments and interventions. If managed properly, fiscal reforms for urban development can bring about greater inter-regional equity and potential economic growth. While the focus of the Submission is on urban areas, the debate should not be an either/or choice between urban and rural development, as both exist in parallel throughout South Africa. The Commission is also interested in rural development as shown in previous submissions, as both rural and urban regions can contribute to national growth and poverty alleviation.  

Click here to download this document. (PDF: 7Mb)

2016/2017 Annual Report

2016/17 Annual Report

The Annual Report is presented in terms of the provisions of section 220 of the Constitution, 1996, section 40 and 65 of the Public Finance Management Act, 1999 and section 26 of the Financial and Fiscal Commission Act, 1997 (as amended). The financial year 2016/17 has seen numerous successes for the Financial and Fiscal Commission as a source of high-quality expert and independent advice for equitable sharing of nationally raised revenue, in building capacity among legislators, and in consolidating its role as foremost constitutional body in promoting a sustainable and equitable intergovernmental fiscal relations system. Our annual constitutional and legislative Submissions: Division of Revenue; Response to the Medium Term Budget Policy Statement; Response to the Division of Revenue Bill; Appropriations Bill; Response to the Fiscal Frameworks and Revenue Proposals were delivered in line with our 2016/17 Annual Performance Plans.

Click here to download this document (PDF:3Mb)

2019 2019 Annual Submission

2019/20 Submission for the Division of Revenue

The 2019/20 Financial and Fiscal Commission’s submission is about the difficulties of sustaining equitable economic growth in the face of a constrained fiscal environment. Under the theme of Re-engineering the intergovernmental fiscal relations system for national development in a fiscally constrained environment, focus is on an extensive review of the performance and effectiveness of current intergovernmental fiscal instruments. The submission recommends how fiscal instruments can be re-engineered to better address the eradication of poverty and thereby the reduce inequality. This submission continues with the theme of the 2018/19 Division of Revenue submission with similar assessments of other areas of public finance issues. It reviews the effectiveness and performance of the current intergovernmental fiscal relations (IGFR) system, and makes recommendations to re-engineer current fiscal instruments, incentives and measures to address challenges that may be preventing the achievement of the NDP’s objectives. 

Click here to download the entire document (PDF:4Mb)

Policy Brief 11 - Potential Financing Options for Large Cities

In South Africa large cities face a myriad of challenges including rapid urbanisation, poverty, inequality, unemployment and huge infrastructure needs. Although these are not unique to large cities, the
magnitude of the challenges in large cities is greater and is increasingly becoming a major risk to the socioeconomic development of the country. The ability of cities to deal with these challenges depends, to a large extent, on their ability to generate more of their own revenues. As transfers and own revenues for large cities are heavily constrained, it is critical that cities leverage non-traditional and other innovative financing mechanisms. This policy brief summarises the findings of a study that evaluated different non-traditional revenues sources for South Africa’s large cities. Findings from the study suggest different options to enhance borrowing for large cities as well as strategies to improve public private partnership (PPP) deal flows in large cities. In addition, the study brings to the fore the value of land value capture mechanisms.

Click here to download this document (PDF:1Mb)

[picture: Krish Kumar] Mr Krish Kumar, Commissioner (1 March 2013–28 February 2018) Mr Krish Kumar commenced work as a Trainee Accountant with the erstwhile Durban City Council in 1981 and progressed through the ranks to become City Treasurer of the North and South Central Local Councils in 1997. In addition, in 1999 he was appointed City Treasurer of the Durban Metropolitan Council and in 2001 Deputy City Manager: Treasury. Krish is a member of the South African Local Government Association’s (SALGA) finance working group, Fellow (and past President) of the Institute of Municipal Finance Officers (IMFO), Chairperson of the Municipal Chief Financial Officers (CFO) Forum and has served two terms as a member of the Accounting Standards Board. He holds a Master of Administration degree from the University of KwaZulu-Natal.

Prof PlaatjiesProf. Daniel Plaatjies (Commissioner from1 September 2013–31 July 2017) (Appointed as Chairperson on 3 July 2017) Daniel Plaatjies is Chairperson of the Financial and Fiscal Commission since 1 July 2017 having previously served since mid-2013 as part-time Commissioner. He specialises in public policy, public finance and governance and is an author and has edited three books: Future Inheritance: Building State Capacity in Democratic South Africa (2011 Jacana Media); Protecting the Inheritance: Governance and Public Accountability in Democratic South Africa (2013 Jacana Media); and State of the Nation: State of the Nation 2016 : Who Is in Charge? (2016 HSRC). He is a founding director of the Rosmead Institute, as well as an experienced executive civil servant, special adviser, academic and researcher in public institutions such as National Treasury, Human Sciences Research Council and the University of Witwatersrand. Plaatjies is also the former Director and Head of the Graduate School for Public and Development Management (now called Graduate School of Governance). He was a leading technocrat in the establishment of the South African Social Security Agency. Plaatjies holds a PhD (Wits), MPhil (UWC), BSocSc Honours (UCT), Diploma VI Social Science (UWC) and numerous professional certificates from international academic institutions.

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“For an Equitable Sharing of National Revenue"

 


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